The Better Work Project: Radical Candour

05 March

What is radical candour? Hosted by David Mantica and Andy Cooper, this podcast explores what radical candour is all about and how you can adopt it to create a more productive and more caring culture. 

 

 

  • Radical candour is about having tough conversations where the person giving the feedback has your best interests and heart, and the person receiving the feedback feels safe.
  • As the receiver of feedback, we need to feel like the person cares deeply as they challenge directly. We feel better off from receiving the feedback. The opposite is an opinion given that we’re not receptive to.
  •  A pre-existing relationship is ideal to support radical candour. We need to show interest in the person beyond the job and understand them and what makes them tick. From that position, people feel comfortable and have trust.
  • We learn more when we know people better.
  • Radical candour helps to build trust.
  • Radical candour can address behaviour or actions that impact relationships or the work environment.
  • Radical candour is typically one-to-one. Radical transparency is more of a principle that applies at an organisational level – can be across a range of perspectives i.e. pay rates. 
  • Accountability is a by-product of other steps that precede it such as trust, ability to face conflict and commitment.
  • Psychological safety is key for teams to operate effectively and to voice their opinions without fear of judgement or retribution – where tough conversations can be held.
  • Google’s Aristotle Project found psychological safety was the most important indication of a successful team.
  • As leaders, we need to focus on creating psychological safety.
  • The more comfortable you are the more creative you can be.
  • Radical candour can be used for positive conversations as well as challenging ones – praise and gratitude are big motivators.
  • Radical candour is a tool to be used selectively. It needs to be used by permission to ensure people are in the right state of mind. It’s important to have situational awareness and emotional intelligence, make sure people are ready and receptive to the message.
  • Truthfulness and authenticity are likeable qualities.



References:

5 Dysfunctions of a Team -  Patrick Leconini
Psychological Safety – Amy Edmondson
Project Aristotle - Google
Radical Candour – Kim Scott

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